Category Archives: Steve

Yarinacocha Snoopy Crashes Steve’s Red Baron

red-heinkelIn 1966, while I [Steve] was in Yarinacocha, Peru, and the Kindberg parents were out in the tribal area, I utilized their high-class motor-scooter (with permission) to get back and forth from the Summer Institute of Linguistics base-camp to the nearby town. I was aware that dogs did not like the motorized vehicles passing on the road and would nip at the heels or legs of foreign cyclists. Plus, at the medical clinic, we’d been warned about an increasingly rabid population among the fauna.

On a pleasant afternoon, as I passed the Albert Schweitzer Clinic on this same road, yours truly was approached by what seemed to be an insulted mongrel; he started at my left leg. Kicking him away only enraged the beast, but kicking seemed to be my best defense against the supposed bearer of rabies. He started to win the battle and so I veered right, just as a small bridge loomed to the left, traversing a creek in the jungle.

With great aplomb and no bridge under its wheels, the man/machine unit flew over this waterway. The prized Heinkel-two-wheel-wonder landed just below the brink of the distant shoreline. The bad news was that its front axle and fork bent, squashing the wheels into the rest of the body. The pinky of the driver’s right hand got “broke.” The good news: the canine stood smiling on the proximal side, wagging his tail as he put another victory scratch in the mud beside the takeoff point.

No more rolling or even limping for the German red metal mass until an airplane mechanic at the JAARS hanger worked to give it a new, though dented, life. As Lee and Will got off the float plane coming in from their tribal stay, each Kindberg kid was sworn not to mention the flight of the Red Baron and the resulting modification of its function and appearance.

But . . . wouldn’t you guess, even before Will stepped from the Piper Cub’s pontoon onto the dock, little Dougie proudly broadcast that “Uncle Steve wrecked Daddy’s Heinkel.” Surprised, but gracious, Will received the news flash and waited a week or two until the vehicle resumed its function.

As for the victorious dog, he still walks with his head high, but no foaming at the mouth. Check one for the animal world.

story told by Steve via email on October 11, 2016; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • What other Uncle Steve stories can you generate: Virginia? Kathy? Eric? Bruce?
  • Or how about stories from France: Sandy? Debby?
  • DD? Jimmy? Gordy?

Kathy and Virginia’s Dad Lets Them Dance

[Virginia]: I was born in September of ’63. So I was born in Peru as well and lived in Peru until I was at the end of my seventh grade year. Then we took a ship, an Italian ship liner, from Peru up over the western part, up north, through the Panama Canal into Colombia. That was kind of interesting, wasn’t it Kathy?

first-class-ballroom-ss-raffaello

[Kathy]: Yes.

[Virginia]: We had never danced before and we got on the ship and they had a dance every night. And so Kathy. . . .

[Kathy]: These guys kept hanging around because Virginia’s so good looking. They were like, “There’s gonna be a dance. Can you guys dance with us?” And we’re like, “No, our dad won’t let us. No, our dad won’t let us!” And they kept asking and asking and finally we were near dad [Will Kindberg] and they asked again and he said, “Yes, you can.”

[Virginia]: So that was kind of interesting: our first, first exposure to dancing. And, of course, didn’t know how to.

[Kathy]: Crossing the equator was a big, a big event while they were having this dance party.

[Virginia]: Yeah.

[Marcia]: What was the name of the ship? Do you remember?

[Virginia]: It was Italian, but I don’t. . . .

[Kathy]: It’s an Italian liner, but it was the last time it was going to run.

[Marcia]: You don’t remember the name of the ship?

[Kathy]: But I don’t remember the name of it.

[Marcia]: Because we crossed the ocean on two. . . .

[Victoria]: Raffaello?

[Steve]: Raffaello.

[Marcia]: We crossed the ocean on the Raffaello and also the Cristoforo Colombo.

[Steve]: It’s the Titanico.

[Virginia]: Yeah.

[joking and laughing; can’t hear]

[Gail]: That was in, that was in ’76. . . .

[Kathy]: You flew out.

[Gail]: I’d already left. Yeah.

[Kathy]: And you had already left. We were moving to Colombia and that was the cheapest way to move us and all of our stuff. Oh, and then we had the bomb as soon as we got this boat to dock.

NB: The Raffaello was indeed withdrawn in April of 1975 and sold to the Shah of Iran in 1976. In 1983, it was torpedoed during the Iraq-Iran War. 

story told by Kathy and Virginia (Lee’s daughters) with interjections by Gail (Lee’s daughter) and Marcia (Steve’s wife) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • What else happened on that ship? How long did the trip take? Did Doug travel with you? Tell us about dancing for the first time.
  • If Gail had already flown out, where did she go? Where was she?
  • What do you recall of your parents during that sail?
  • Who else has crossing the ocean in ships stories you want to tell us?

Duncan Laugh Gene

[Eric]: Some of these pictures in here—I don’t know if you had a chance to see them while Mary Lynn was talking, but—Uncle Tad and Uncle Steve joking together.

This is not the photo Eric was looking at, but it is evidence of the genetic nature that Gloria describes below. On the left, Tad with horns. On the right, Steve with horns. 

[Gloria]: Yeah, that was a good one.

[Eric]: Uncle Tad laughed and laughed. I mean he always was laughing and I love to be around Uncle Tad.

[Gloria]: And, you know, he thought he was the funniest person. He would tell a joke and he’d laugh like it was. And Chris and I—‘cause I do that now. I’ll tell a joke to them two and I’m just a-laughing. And they think, “Why do you think you’re so funny?” My dad was the same way. He just thought he was the funniest person.

[Gail]: It’s the Duncan gene.

[Gloria]: He was a good person.

[Gail]: He had such a good laugh.

story told by Gloria (Tad’s daughter) with interjections by Gail and Eric (Lee’s kids),) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • I’m not in possession of this particular photo, but how about everyone send me or post your photos of family members laughing.

 

Park Street Church Supports Every Odd Child

Park Street Church as seen from Suffolk University Law School, 9.28.2012, courtesy of David Bruce[Eric]: Yeah, I went to Moody, Moody Bible Institute, planning to go—so one year at the King’s College and then I wanted to transfer to Moody. That was when I joined Park Street, actually. Between Moody, I mean, The King’s College and Moody, I had to be a member of a church. Up to that point, I wasn’t one, so I asked Dr. Toms if I could become a member. They kind of took me on as an unusual case because they don’t normally accept somebody so quickly. But since they had supported me since I was a baby—they support the parent plus every other child. And so. . . .

[Stephanie]: Really?

[Eric]: That’s the way they did it for our family.

[Stephanie]: Every other child?

[maybe Heidi or Kim]: That’s just demented.

[Stephanie]: What, in the world, does that mean?

[Eric]: Since my mother. . . .

[Steve]: No. What he means is every odd child.

[Stephanie]: What does it—? No. I really want a serious answer. What, in the world, does that mean? Like, the rest of the children don’t get supported, too bad for them?

[Mary Lynn]: Isn’t that weird?

[TJ]: Is that when they get sent down on a raft in a whirlpool?

[Kim]: I guess the others [laughter; can’t hear].

[Eric]: The reason was because they didn’t support. . . . They supported my mother, who was from Park Street, but my dad was being supported from another church. And so they supported every other child, along with my mother. I don’t know why it was arranged that way, but that’s the way it was.

[Marcia]: I think part of the idea was that they didn’t want to give full support to the whole family because then, if for some reason they couldn’t follow through on that—correct me if I’m wrong—you didn’t have any other support out there.

[Eric]: Right.

[Marcia]: You couldn’t have any other support out there. Which is very interesting because, you know, in the late ‘90s, they went to a full-support system, in which they started supporting everybody—

[Eric]: Full time.

[Marcia]: —full time, so that they could have you when you came home on furlough. They could have you there within their church, because they just felt like everybody was doing a cameo appearance, you know, and people didn’t know the missionaries. It was a lot harder for them to raise money to send out missionaries. So their whole idea was if the missionary can work in the church when they’re on furlough, then they will become better known and all of that.

[Steve]: That was post-Kindberg.

story told by Eric (Lee’s son) with interjections by Steve, Stephanie, Kimberly and Heidi (Steve’s daughters), TJ (Kathryn’s son) and an explanation by Marcia (Steve’s wife) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • What other funding models did missionaries in the family pursue?
  • What other churches supported Lee and Will Kindberg’s work as Bible translators with SIL?

Duncan Descendants Family Reunion

Chicago | May 27–30, 2016

Dear Duncan Family:

We are excited about the upcoming reunion—less than 1 month away!

We have approximately 34 scheduled to attend. By email, you should have received a file with attendees, their contact information, as well as who has cars (for carpooling).

  • Staying in a Duncan home? Please check the file to see who you will be staying with.
  • Still need a room? Please let Bonnie know asap by clicking here.
  • Prefer a hotel? We recommend the Holiday Inn O’Hare, which is very close. Click here.

We are looking forward to seeing you!  Please let me know if you have any questions or comments or if there is anything I can help you with ahead of your trip!

See you Friday night at 7pm (at Joy’s)!

Bonnie

(ALWAYS UPDATED) WEBSITE:  http://www.duncan2016.myevent.com/ 

Duncan Descendants Family Reunion

Dates:  Friday, May 27 – Monday, May 30, 2016

Nearest Airport:  O’Hare (ORD) is 10 minutes from Duncan HQ.

Other Airport: Midway (MDW) is 40 minutes away.

Duncan Contacts:  Click here for Barb Duncan. Click here for Bonnie Tinder.

Facebook Reunion Site: Click here to post pictures, watch the weekend, comment and connect.

Weekend Lineup

Friday

7:00 pm — Italian Dinner & Welcome Kickoff at Joy Duncan Farina’s Home

Saturday

9:00 am— Breakfast at Taylor Duncan’s Home

11:00 am— Depart for Downtown Chicago Duncan Scavenger Hunt and Chicago Tour (weather permitting)

6:00 pm— Duncan Family Luau at Bonnie Duncan Tinder’s Home

Sunday

10:30 am— Worship Service Together at South Park Church

following— Lunch Together at South Park Church

afternoon— Group Activities around Chicago

5:00 pm— Dinner Together at Portillo’s in Niles

Monday

9:00 am— Park Ridge Memorial Day Parade and Activities

following— Visit to Wally Duncan’s Gravesite, Town of Maine Cemetery

afternoon— Departures

 

 

Bruce Does Drugs, Eric’s Brain Leaks

[Mary Lynn]: Bruce was the star athlete of Yarinacocha, too.

[Eric]: Yup.

[Kathy]: Oh, yeah, he was!

[Mary Lynn]: Athletics was, like, huge.

[Kathy]: Bruce had a lot of records.

[Mary Lynn]: A lot of what?

[Kathy]: Records.

[Eric]: Fastest runner. Best hurdler. I don’t know about swimming, but almost everything else.

[Bruce]: The Indians set me up with some drugs.

[Gloria]: Performance-enhancing drugs?

[Marcia]: Performance-enhancing, yeah.

[Eric]: OK, so, Mary Lynn and I got married in 1980. We met in graduate school in Dallas. When I left Peru, I came back and went to the King’s College in New York.

[Mary Lynn]: Honey, you’ve got to tell your brain surgery story.

[Eric]: Oh, OK. Back up a little.

[Marcia]: How about when you were born?

[Stephanie]: He doesn’t remember, Mom.

[Eric]: I don’t remember.

[Marcia]: You don’t know what year you were born?

[Eric]: Oh, OK. Yeah. 1954. Bruce was born in 1953 and we were 17 days apart, so we always opt and celebrated our birthdays together.

[Mary Lynn]: Seventeen days and a year.

[Eric]: Pardon me?

[Steve]: A year and 17 days.

[Marcia]: I hope it was a year.

[Eric]: Seventeen days. Plus a year.

[Steve]: I’ve done that, fooling the patients, that distance between the deliveries.

[Eric]: Uncle Steve, you always come up with the best comments. I remember we were at Park Street Church talking in a conference, you know, with a whole congregation of people. This was during a Duncan family reunion there. Well, here I am up on the platform, nervous as anything and I’m telling my story of living in Kokorake [sp?] at 11,500 feet and Uncle Steve yells out from the audience, “Hope you didn’t fall off the roof!”

You’ve got some good ones. Everyone broke up. I’m glad you keep the humor in the family.

[Mary Lynn]: You and Bruce were in the same grade all through school.

[Eric]: We were in the same grade from first grade on.

So, let’s see. Came back to the States, went to the King’s College.

[Mary Lynn]: Tell the story.

Oh, back to the. . . . When I was ten, we were in the States. You know, people always say, “What about all the wild animals down there? What about, you know, the insects and all these evil, bad things that you hear about?” Well, I came to the States and never had had anything happen to me. Well, Bruce and I were racing across the street in Bloomfield, New Jersey, running to the church, and I got bit by a car.

[Stephanie]: Oh-oh.

[Eric]: So I was 9 years old and it hit me in the side of the face and twirled me around and broke, shattered my knee, my femur. So the doctors thought they would have to amputate my leg. Finally were able to piece it back together and I was in a body cast for quite a while until I got chicken pox. They cut off the upper part and let me at least scratch my itches. But yeah. So that was quite an experience.

[Marcia]: Now she said “brain surgery”?

[Mary Lynn]: Yeah.

[Eric]: Following that. Yeah, following that. I had a fracture and they thought it was just a concussion at the time. They didn’t realize I had a hairline fracture. When I was thirteen, I developed spinal meningitis, back in Peru.

[Victoria]: Oh, my goodness!

[Eric]: Three times. The first time was natural. It’s normal to get spinal meningitis once. Maybe not normal, but, you know, you never are supposed to get it a second time. I developed a second case of it and they knew something was wrong. So they sent me to Lima for observation and tested—you know, I had spinal fluid actually leaking through my nostril, so they realized that they needed to perform surgery to close up that fracture that was still there. So I had brain surgery when I was 13 after the third incident.

[Marcia]: In Lima?

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernando_Cabieses

Fernando Cabieses Molina, courtesy of Wikipedia

[Eric]: In Lima. And the neat thing about that is the way that God works. You know, you think of being on a mission field and what kind of medical care can you get there? Here we were, didn’t have the money to send me back to the States or whatever. So here I am in Lima. My doctor was called Dr. Cabieses. Well, he happened to be one of the world’s leading neurosurgeons. Not only that, but there was a conference of the world’s leading neurosurgeons right there in Lima, so he took my case before all of them, so I had the world’s experts in on my case. God is good.

[Kathy]: That’s how he turned out to be so smart.

[Eric]: Right.

[Stephanie]: So what was—you developed a third case of it later?

[Eric]: Third case, while I was in Lima.

[Stephanie]: While you were in Lima.

[Kathy]: I remember, as a kid, when he had that, it was really scary because his fever would go so high, he got very delirious. And I was having a sleepover with some friends. We were going to sleep in the rec-room, which was just separated from the house a little bit, but you could hear him yelling out, counting really fast, up and backward, and just kind of yelling out unusual things because he was delirious. It was just really unsettling to hear your brother. He went on to Lima or had gotten better soon after that.

[Eric]: Yeah, that was, I think, the first incident, or maybe the first or second one. They give you a spinal tap when you have spinal meningitis. They put this long needle. You have to roll up in a ball, so you separate your vertebrae. They put this needle in your back. It is the most—it’s like being in a dentist chair, having that needle, you know, that drill going into your mouth, into your teeth. I hated it. ‘Course I had high fevers at the time when they were doing the surgery, the uh, inserting the needle to get the spinal fluid out to test it.

But, yeah, God is good. I lived through it. Did give me a little touch of something, I’m sure. Did something to my brain.

[Steve, relaying question]: Does he hallucinate anymore?

[Mary Lynn]: Strange dreams. He’s had strange dreams sometimes.

[Eric]: Well, she puts me out of the room. I have to sleep in a separate room because I talk too much in the night. No.

Actually that’s pretty close to the truth. I snore too much at night.

[Mary Lynn]: But that’s why—well, I don’t know if you want to say that—but that also influenced why you ended up going into Bible translation and not aviation.

[Eric]: That’s right.

story told by Eric (Lee’s son) with interjections by Mary Lynn (Eric’s wife), Kathy and Bruce (Lee’s children), Steve, Stephanie (Steve’s daughter), Marcia (Steve’s wife), Gloria (Tad’s daughter), and Victoria (TJ’s wife) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • How do you spell Kokorake? Where was it? When did Eric live there?
  • Where did Eric receive the spinal tap that diagnosed the spinal meningitis?
  • Anybody else have chicken pox as kids? Tell us what you remember.

Shoot Between the Eyes

[Dawn]: You said “alligator hunting”? Lots of it? Successfully, obviously?

[Bruce]: Yeah. We would get the smallest. No wrestling. I actually did taste them . . . [can’t hear] . . . oral cavity was smaller.

[Dawn]: Oh, that’s right. You had a stuffed one that you brought home, right, Dad?

[Steve]: He was a pet [joking, I think].

[Marcia]: Yeah. He did.

[Marcia]: But you would go out at night?

[?]: Yeah, we did.

[Marcia]: And shine the flashlight out and see the eyes.

[Dawn]: And then what would you do?

[Eric]: Shoot between the eyes!

[can’t hear; joking through the following]

[Dawn]: Put your hand in?

[?]: Jump in?

[Bruce]: You have to save yourself.

[Marcia]: Oh you reached in with your hand to get it?

[Steve]: I only did it once.

[Eric]: I’ll tell another story or two. Anything else about Peru, right off the top of your head?

Well, I’m second [child]. One of the things I remember the most about Peru, one of the favorite trips, was a trip around the southern part of Peru on motorcycle. Bruce had a Triumph 500 at the time and he and my dad went on that motorcycle. A friend of ours went with his dad on another large motorcycle. I went with a Peruvian on a BMW 500 or 650. It had . . . so we got to see all the Inca sites along the way. We have a whole carousel of slides, but that’s too boring to show all of you. It was really quite a trip. I think I was 16 at the time, or 15, and you were 16 or something like that.

[Bruce]: While we’re talking about motorcycles, I want Uncle Steve to talk about his Heinkel, his Heinkel experience.

[Steve]: My what? Oh. Ha-ha.

[Eric]: I refrained from bringing that one up last night.

[Bruce]: A Heinkel is like a scooter. It’s like a Lambretta scooter. That’s what a lot of people had down there. Uncle Steve liked those scooters. He got around quite a bit on that one.

We used to carry our dog on the floorboard of that. He stuck his head out one time and went tumbling.

[Dawn]: Awwww.

[Bruce]: From that point on, that dog would not leave the side of that scooter. He was guarding that scooter because—at first we couldn’t get him on there at all. Then once he went for a ride and was able to survive the tumble down the road, then he wouldn’t leave the side of that. He would guard that scooter.

[Kathy?]: Good old Snippy.

[Eric]: Yup. Snippy.

[Gail?]: Snippy.

story told by Bruce and Eric (Lee’s sons) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • What kind of dog was Snippy? How’d Snippy get that name?
  • How’d you come to get the dog? Was he a guard dog or just a pet? Was it common for people in Yarinacocha to have pets?
  • Approximately what length were the alligators in this story?
  • What was the bit I couldn’t hear with reaching down or into the alligator mouth?
  • Did the alligators come up onto the compound regularly or were you going out to find them?
  • Bruce said he tasted alligator. Did you eat them when you killed them?
  • What did you shoot them with?