Tag Archives: Gloria Boyer

Duncan Laugh Gene

[Eric]: Some of these pictures in here—I don’t know if you had a chance to see them while Mary Lynn was talking, but—Uncle Tad and Uncle Steve joking together.

This is not the photo Eric was looking at, but it is evidence of the genetic nature that Gloria describes below. On the left, Tad with horns. On the right, Steve with horns. 

[Gloria]: Yeah, that was a good one.

[Eric]: Uncle Tad laughed and laughed. I mean he always was laughing and I love to be around Uncle Tad.

[Gloria]: And, you know, he thought he was the funniest person. He would tell a joke and he’d laugh like it was. And Chris and I—‘cause I do that now. I’ll tell a joke to them two and I’m just a-laughing. And they think, “Why do you think you’re so funny?” My dad was the same way. He just thought he was the funniest person.

[Gail]: It’s the Duncan gene.

[Gloria]: He was a good person.

[Gail]: He had such a good laugh.

story told by Gloria (Tad’s daughter) with interjections by Gail and Eric (Lee’s kids),) to the family reunion gathering on January 11, 2014; transcribed by Dawn Duncan Harrell (Steve’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below. (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.)

  • I’m not in possession of this particular photo, but how about everyone send me or post your photos of family members laughing.

 

A Most Unusual Man

Front Cover

Steve Duncan profile in The Samaritan’s Daily Walk, front cover, 1985

Steve Duncan profile in The Samaritan’s Daily Walk, front cover, 1985

Dr. Steve Duncan, pictured on the cover, is a most unusual man. During his early twenties, he heard a missionary doctor speak in Boston about the opportunities for the Gospel in the southwest African nation of Angola. As he listened, God touched his heart to become a medical missionary. At the age of 26, Steve applied for admission to medical school in the United States but was refused. Undaunted, he wrote to a school in Italy, was accepted, and moved there to begin his studies. Six years later, after completing his courses, he graduated and returned to the U.S. to do his surgical training. Soon afterwards, he took his wife and four daughters to Angola to fulfill God’s calling and serve Him there. Now 43, Dr. Duncan and his family have labored for several years in Angola to make Jesus Christ known through missionary medicine.

Angola, a Marxist nation, is one of the most difficult places anywhere in the world today. A ten-year civil war, combined with drought, famine, and disease, has created a great need for Samaritans—individuals like the one Jesus told about, who gave of himself to demonstrate Christ’s love to others. Dr. Steve Duncan is indeed a Samaritan. On the back cover is an account from his daily walk, which I pray will encourage you to make the most of every opportunity the Lord gives you for His glory.

Back Cover

Steve Duncan profile in The Samaritan’s Daily Walk, back photo, 1985

Steve Duncan profile in The Samaritan’s Daily Walk, back photo, 1985

Because of the civil war raging in Angola for more than a decade, travel there is always risky, sometimes deadly. Land mines, some powerful enough to destroy large trucks, are a threat on many roads. Although daytime driving is a little safer because one can spot potholes, which often contain explosives, travel at night is to be avoided.

Dr. Steve Duncan stopped one evening to spend the night in a small remote town. Soon a local resident came and asked him to examine ‘about eight’ of his friends who were ill. “We have had no doctor for years,” he explained. “Please help us.”

Dr. Duncan agreed, only to be introduced to nearly 20 sick people! “I’ll see half of them tonight and the other half in the morning,” he decided. Next morning, though almost 80 people wanted to “see the doctor.”

“What can I do?” Dr. Duncan wondered. “I don’t have time to examine all of them—yet all need help.” He determined that even though he couldn’t not physically treat all the patients, he would at least point them to God, who is able to meet every need.

“I prayed with each person, encouraging them to place their trust in Christ,” said Dr. Duncan. “That way, God could get the mileage out of the situation.”

Giving God the mileage out of each needy situation—that’s a good principle to remember while serving Christ in our hurting world.

transcription of articles by Franklin Graham, The Samaritan’s Daily Walk (Boone, NC: Samaritan’s Purse, October 1985), front and back covers; found and contributed by Gloria Boyer [Tad’s daughter] to the family reunion gathering on January 10, 2014

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  • What do you remember of Franklin Graham’s visit to Angola with his two colleagues?
  • Who else has articles about the Duncan Eight stashed somewhere that you might like to contribute to eightduncans.com? Can you scan them? Would you like to drop them in the mail? I can email you my address if you need it. Let me know in the comments box below.

 

Generous with Money, Time and Knowledge

Tad and Trey, ca. 1980Well, I hear everybody talking about my dad and I said, yeah, I’ll tell some stories.

I remember him as being a very generous man. And I remember when he was a landlord. These tenants would come by and give him a sad story, and he’s giving them money. And I’m going, “Dad! This is a for-profit business and you’re not doing a very good job! You know, just giving away money!” It would just make me so mad.

He was very generous with his time and very generous with his knowledge. I was talking to a friend of mine. I told him what happened and he says, “He got to spend the last year of his life, it was with you, working on your house in Arizona.”

I would come home and I would say, “Yeah, I didn’t do much of nothin’ today, Dad.” And he’d say, “Well, look at everything you learned.”

He had a lot of knowledge and he knew how to do everything. I’d say, “I don’t know how to fix this, Dad.” And he’d say, “This is how you fix it.” I thought, well, I’ll go on the internet and see what the internet says. It said the same thing, too. So that was it. He had a lot of knowledge and he knew a little bit about everything.

I miss him and I think about him when I travel on the highways.

Trey (Tad’s son), speaking at Tad’s memorial service, Wildwood Baptist Church (950 County Line Church Road, Griffin, GA 30223), June 22, 2012, audio provided by Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter)

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  • What did Tad teach you?
  • What did Tad help you fix?
  • What did Tad lend you money for?

Tad Grabs Pig-Headed Boys but Can’t Hold a Note

Tad Duncan with zits, nd, taken at Alston Studios, Inc. courtesy of Gloria Boyer

Tad, perhaps at the age of the boys he helped.

I met Tad about 2003 or 2004 when he and Carol came to church. At that time, I was working with about 25 to 30 kids, some rough kids actually, some boys that would tear you down and say anything. Ralph was trying to help me with them, but Ralph couldn’t be over there with me and over here with the church. So I was kind of hanging out there with 30 kids and having to look over my shoulder, just really trying to bring the Lord to these kids.

We had some old trailers out here. All of the sudden, here was Tad and he was talking about, “What do you need to do?”

And I said, “Well, Tad, you know if we had this wall knocked down and a room in here, we could meet in here. We could do this.”

Next day I came over to the church to bring some stuff and the walls were coming down! Tad was over there working his heart out. One thing I learned about him, he was a do-er. He is a do-er and now he’s a do-er in heaven, too, now.

He had a humility about him. He taught me humility because something about him. I saw him. People say to me, “He’s too [unclear].” And yet he got up there and made the choir, but he was tone-deaf. He told you he was tone-deaf. But he was up there leading that choir because he liked to sing. He wouldn’t hit those notes. He never hit those notes, but he liked being up there singing. We needed someone up there and so he was up there.

I loved Tad. He was there when I needed him. He had my back. And those boys—he’d come over there with those boys—and those boys were pig-headed. I mean they were pig-headed something bad. But you know he would grab hold of them, hug ‘em, and love ‘em. And those boys would right now tell you Tad was a good man.

I know he’s up there with Jesus. I praise the Lord that I met him. I know he’s saved.

unidentified friend, speaking at Tad’s memorial service, Wildwood Baptist Church (950 County Line Church Road, Griffin, GA 30223), June 22, 2012, audio provided by Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.).

  • The lady speaking refers to “Ralph,” who I presume is Ralph Simmons, the minister. Can someone remember and share her name? Gloria?
  • Was it 2003 or 2004 when Tad and Carol came to church?
  • Is she referring to Union Church or Wildwood Baptist?

Gold Out of Coal

Tad Duncan, Airforce, nd, courtesy of Gloria BoyerI’m going to try to do this. I don’t have anything planned.

I was Daddy’s little girl. I’m just like him. I never meet a stranger. I look like him. I’m part of the Duncan clan, too. I’m Duncan to the heart. Even my in-laws are Duncans.

I’m very proud for my father. And if there’s any word I could say for him, it was “generous.” He was a doer. He was a worker. He made gold out of coal. He would fix anything like everybody said.

He was a behind-the-scenes person. He gave when nobody else knew he gave. He didn’t want anybody to know that he gave. He would give cars. He would give money. He even worked in the prison ministry in California for many years, working in the prison with these men and delivering cookies with Robert Schuller. He just did a lot of things. If there’s any lesson I can learn from him it’s to be generous and to give and to love like he did.

I’ve even fixed toilets because my dad showed me how to fix toilets. I’ve learned how to do things that I never would have if he’d never taught me. I don’t look like the type that would scrape paint or get the . . . fix a toilet if it’s leaking. But my dad taught me how to do that. He taught me how to do the little jobs that mean the most. And I appreciate that.

Tad and Gloria, 1990, courtesy of Gloria BoyerI love you, Daddy. Happy birthday.

transcription of Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter), speaking at Tad’s memorial service, Wildwood Baptist Church (950 County Line Church Road, Griffin, GA 30223), June 22, 2012, audio provided by Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.).

  • What (else) did Tad teach you to do?
  • Who else has a story of Tad’s behind-the-scenes generosity that you’d like to share?
  • This photo is Tad in the Air Force. When was he in the Air Force? Can you guess at dates if you don’t know them.

A She-Bear and a Man without Guile

Carol, Tad, Gloria, Trey, ca. 1970 or 71Today is Uncle Tad’s 75th birthday. It’s his first birthday in heaven, and we rejoice with him. You know, as I was reflecting back on my uncle, there are several word pictures that come to mind, pictures of his qualities.

One of the first ones that came to mind was that he is like Nathanael. Do you know when Jesus called Nathaniel what he said of him [John 1:47]? Do you remember the story?

[Answering from the crowd]: A man without guile.

A man without guile. That’s the way I think of Uncle Tad. He’s a man, an honest man, a man who didn’t beat around the bushes. He just told the truth.

So I appreciate my uncle in many ways, lots of other ways, but I want to read to you a letter from my sister Gail, who spent some time with them.

Also before I do that, I want to just mention that one of his generous qualities was to, well to supply needs whenever they were there. It’s been mentioned several times already. When my mother had a need—she was without a vehicle for a while—Uncle Tad just gave her a vehicle, just gave her a car. She drove that car for years and years.

My sister Gail has driven with my Uncle Tad. She lives in Arizona as well. When my Uncle Tad drove out to my mother’s husband’s, to Ken’s funeral, she says: “I have felt close to Uncle Tad and Aunt Carol since they lived in the Tucson area the numerous past years and I spent a good amount of time with them. Uncle Tad drove me from Tucson to Santa Ana for Ken’s funeral and back. We had such a great quality time together.”

And then Gail had the chance, along with my sister Virginia, to be in Tucson for the funeral during that period of time. She said, “A couple of nights after Uncle Tad died, I had a dream. In my dream I saw Uncle Tad in heaven. He could look down and see Aunt Carol, Gloria, and Trey, the family along with many others who were sad. But then he turned his face to Jesus and fell on his knees and fell prostrate before the Lord Jesus. From what I could see in my dream, he was so overwhelmed with being in His presence, he started raising his hands, crying, and singing praises to Jesus. And Gail says, “He wasn’t in tune either, but Jesus didn’t care.

“The Lord gave me such peace. I was sad for myself off and on, but I want to be happy for him. He’s in the presence of the Lord.”

And I have just a few words that I shared myself. I was writing, actually, a letter and as I thought and thought through some different episodes of my time with my Uncle Tad, some of the qualities that he has, this is what I put together.

“I think of Uncle Tad being present at gatherings, at this gathering as he almost always was for the Duncan clan, entertaining with interjected wise cracks from a side table—welcome humor when least expected and typically self-effacing. At this celebration of his life and in his honor, he’s undoubtedly watching now, too, from behind a curtain. But if we listen closely, we may just hear his unbridled guffaws at his own expense.

“You know the character types that Gary Smalley writes about, that he uses? I don’t know if you do, but the lion, the otter, the beaver, and the golden retriever. Some of you may have heard of those different character quality types. Well, Uncle Tad was a bear, a honey bear most of the time, who loved the unfortunate and would do anything for you, but with a healthy dose of mother she-bear at times, uncommonly loyal and protective and utterly transparent. He was just like Nathanael.

“With his gusto laugh and quiet generosity, he left his mark everywhere.” And then I mention the car that he gave to my mother when she had a need. “As a Wycliffe Associate, he spent lots and lots of time in Arizona.” You all know that. He went to actually live there. “He was always filling gaps wherever they may be. He was an engineer who preferred to drive a truck; a Crystal Palace[Crystal Cathedral]volunteer who quietly, energetically carried gifts to needy children; a dedicated and loving husband and father. Gloria’s Facebook ID pictures him well: Uncle Tad’s mischievous grin that would charm a clam and her kiss gladly returning his generous love.

“How can we go on without a man of his character and stature? Well Uncle Tad would probably quip with a belly laugh, ‘Wanna’ trade places?’

“Where he is now, I wouldn’t mind. I’d be glad to.”

transcription of Eric Kindberg [Lee’s son], speaking at Tad’s memorial service, Wildwood Baptist Church (950 County Line Church Road, Griffin, GA 30223), June 22, 2012, audio provided by Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.).

  • Gail, can you tell us more about your ride to and from Ken’s funeral with Uncle Tad?
  • Will someone tell the story of how Aunt Lee and Uncle Ken came together?
  • What jokes can you recall Uncle Tad telling?
  • What was the date of Ken’s funeral?

Tad’s Renault Flaps Its Wings

So this is from my Uncle Harley.

“My earliest recollections of Tad when I entered the Duncan Domain [1952] with the intent of stealing his sister [Betty]—let me tell you about that sometime; what a deal!

Toy Renault 1950“He was just a young squirt. As he grew up, there came the infatuation with motor vehicles. I believe one of them was a Quatre Chevaux (Eric: however you say that in French) or a four-horse Renault. It had turn signals on it, which were little signals mounted between the front and back doors on each side. If one wanted to turn left, you hit the switch and a little lighted arm swung out. The same for a right-hand turn. Not satisfied with this simple maneuver, Tad would quickly switch from right to left to right to left. If one were following him, it would look like a little sick bird flapping its wings trying to take off.”

So that was my Uncle Tad. I mean my Uncle Harley.

transcription of Eric Kindberg [Lee’s son], speaking at Tad’s memorial service, Wildwood Baptist Church (950 County Line Church Road, Griffin, GA 30223), June 22, 2012, audio provided by Gloria Boyer (Tad’s daughter)

Can you add to the story? Please do. Write in the box below (You may need to click “Leave a Reply” above to make the box, name, and address fields appear.).

  • Lee, Betty, Steve: what other toys do you recall playing with when you were young?
  • What were your favorite books as a kid?
  • For example, Dad can you tell about your favorite child-hood storybook, which Mum says is The Little Engine That Could? What did you like about it?
  • Harley, Marcia, Barbara, Polly: can you share stories you remember your spouses telling of child-hood favorites?
  • Cousins: can you share stories you recall of your parents’ child-hood toys or books?